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for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wilson: and to revise and extend my remarks. madam speaker, at midnight tonight, our nation is scheduled to fall off the fiscal cliff because the augusta chronicle editorial of december 2 is correct. quote, it's that stubborn adherence to big spending that is powering the momentum toward the fiscal cliff. halting base spending is what's going to stop it. end of editorial. over the past year, house republicans have passed effective bipartisan legislation to prevent the entire fiscal cliff. unfortunately, these bills remain stalled in the senate graveyard. this fact makes it very clear that house republicans have addressed this issue and speaker john boehner is holding firm for fiscal responsibility. with only a few hours to go, it's my hope that the senate will accept one of our proposals and send legislation back to the house that will attempt to tackle out-of-control
from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip each, to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. the reality behind the fiscal cliff is that if we really get down to work, talking with one another, digging into the details, it really is not that hard. the nuclear arsenal is a prime example and something that doesn't get
that work. thank you, madam president. and i thank my colleagues. i yield the floor and note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: mr. mccain: i ask that further proceedings under the quorum call be suspended and that i be recognized to address the senate as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: one of the most overused quotes about this town is harry truman's observation years ago that if you want a friend in washington, go out and get a dog. i spent a good many years here now, and i suppose there is a little truth in that advice. some washington friendships can be a little like temporary alliances between nations that for a brief period of time have mutual interests or enemies, but not all friendships here are like that. not all of them. today i say a former fond farewell to a departing colleague whose friendship has been and will always be one of the greatest treasures of my life. my friend senator joe lieberman is retiring from the senate after 24 years
will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: madam speaker, there is nothing more americana than the image of happy children at school during the christmas season. that week that norman rockwell picture was stolen. here are 23 of the 26 victims that were murdered that day. we should know their photographs. we should know their names. they were chase k
--. the presiding officer: we're in a quorum call, madam. ms. mikulski: i ask that the call of the quorum be vacated. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. mikulski: and i ask to speak on the pending nomination of judge paul grimm on which we will vote on shortly. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. mikulski: thank you very much, mr. president. mr. president, i am so proud to be here to support the nomination of judge paul grimm. a stellar marylander and outstanding legal mind and nominated to serve on the district court of maryland. senator cardin and i recommended judge grimm to president obama with the utmost confidence in his abilities, talent, and competence for the job. and the a.b.a. agreed with us and gave him the highest rating of unanimously qualified. i'd like to thank senators reid and mcconnell for breaking the logjam so that we could bring this to everyone's attention and commend senator leahy for the swift movement through the committee process. i take the -- i've had the opportunity to recommend several judicial nominees, and take my advise and consent responsibilit
? i yield the floor, senator leahy. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: madam president, what is the parliament situation? the presiding officer: the senate is in a period of morning business. mr. leahy: i thank the distinguished presiding officer. i assume then that we're going back and forth? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: madam president, i would be happy to accommodate other senators, but i came to the floor to speak for about ten minutes on the supplemental. i see senator mccain. i don't know if he came to speak on senator inouye or the supplemental. senator merkley and senator stabenow want to offer an amendment or introduce an amendment. is that appropriate? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. that is appropriate. the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: i would request we do as usual in morning business, back and forth, if that's all right. if i could follow the senator from louisiana? the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: and if the senator would yield, the senat
. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent top dispense with the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president, i ask unanimous consent the period for morning business for debate only be extended until 3:00 p.m. with senators -- for debate only to be extended until 3:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corker: madam president, i'd like to ask unanimous consent that we vitiate the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. corker: madam president, i just listened to the president and my heart is still pounding. i was very disappointed to he
. quorum call: quorum call: mr. levin: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. mr. levin: madam president, i ask further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that the only additional first-degree amendment remaining in order to the bill be the following: mccain amendment 3262 on syria as modified with changes at the desk, that there then be 20 minutes equally divided in the usual form on the amendment, that any remaining time prior to 4:30 be equally divided between the chairman and ranking member for general debate on the bill, and that at 4:30 all postcloture time be considered expired, the senate proceed to a vote -- to votes in relation to the mccain amendment as modified, that no amendments be in order to the amendment prior to the vote, that upon disposition of the mccain amendment the senate agree to the pending kyl amendment, which is a kyl-kerry amendment, 3123 as modified. that upon disposition of the kyl amendment the senate proceed to a vote
session. mr. reid: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that we now proceed to a period of morning business and that senators are allowed to speak for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: madam president, i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to calendar number 246, s. 1792. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar numbered 246, s. 1792, a bill to clarify the authority of the united states marshals service and so forth. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate will proceed to the measure. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the bill be read a third time, passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, there being no intervening action or debate and that any statements related to this matter be placed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask we proceed to calendar numbered 233, s. 1793. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar 233, s. 1793, a bill to amend title 28 united states code, and so forth and f
on s. 3254 as amended. the senator from michigan. mr. levin: madam president, i will take but one minute. the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. go ahead. mr. levin: i will take but just one minute. i just feel so grateful and so proud that a tradition of our committee in this senate has been maintained. our 51st cost-effective defense authorization -- 51st consecutive defense authorization bill, a bill that is vitally important to our nation. i'm grateful to our colleagues for working on a bipartisan basis through a normal and open legislative process to produce this bill. i'm grateful to stand here with my partner, senator mccain, and work together on this bill, to all of the members of the committee, to our staff, the floor and cloakroom staff. we passed over 100 amendments. it was a process which allowed us to be just as accommodating as we humanly could. again, the balance of my statement will be put into the record, but one person i want to single out is someone who has worked for the committee for 41 years. this will be her last year, chris cower. she is our ch
for the immigration of its citizens, affecting mainly soviet jews. it was controversial in its time. madam president, people said why are we connecting human rights to trade? why is the united states doing that? after all, trade is so important. well, we did it and it made a huge difference, and we were able to get soviet jews out of the soviet union. we spoke for western values in our trade legislation. we protected the rights of individuals that refused this. when i first came to congress 26 years ago, i joined the congressional caucus for soviet jewry. i wore the wristbands. 25 years ago, i marched in washington, a march for soviet jews. we stood up for basic rights, and we changed the landscape on this issue. i had a chance to be with natan sharansky and celebrate what he meant to freedom around the world. we initiated that with jackson-vanik. it's a proud chapter in american history. today we end that chapter because jackson-vanik is no longer relevant to the human rights challenges of our time. but with the passage of the sergei magnitsky accountability act, we meet the challenges of our time.
, an adversary today will be an ally tomorrow. it is a rare occasion for acrimony to turn personal. madam president, it would be my party hope that this collegiality will not be lost. protecting the rights of the minority has assured that every senators voices are heard and every state representative is heard. as intended. open debate and open amendment are what differentiates the senate and house. when our committees function, we passed bills and vigorous markups, we've put the bills in shape for floor debate. if they don't go through committees and are not allowed floor amendments, the quality of the legislation suffers, and mistakes are often made. let me give you some examples of how relationships can produce results. during the anthrax scare, the hart building was closed for a month which made it very difficult, of course, for senators based there to do their work. self-centered diane feinstein's staff joined in my offices in the russell building. my chief of staff at the time gave him full access. one of senator feinstein's staff members commented on that, a republican office giving
and those who reminded us we are all part of the same american family. madam president, yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: before the senator from illinois leaves the floor, i commend him for his statement statement, first on his nominee for illinois judgeship, something that's been delayed far too long through no fault of the senator from illinois. madam president, this weekend was a very difficult and trying weekend, for our families and so many other families, nothing compared to t families in newtown, of course. i pretty much stayed off the phone, spent time with children and grandchildren. made an exception for a couple of phone calls with the distinguished senior senator from illinois. i told him when we come back in a couple of weeks in the new congress, i'll work with him to make sure the senate judiciary committee has full and thorough hearings on the subjects he's just talked about. just as he stated here so eloquently and as he did in his television interviews this weekend. it is the time to have -- the pre
's condition, so anything i'm about to say is about this disorder in general and not about madame secretary. you know, blood clots are common. they affect over 400,000 individuals in the united states annually. and there are certain situations that put us at higher risk. for example if we have an injury and we're put to bed for a couple weeks and we're 20 years of age then we maybe have a 20% likelihood of developing a blood clot. if we're 60, it may be higher, approaching 60%. so the situations put us at higher risk for blood clots. >> what about if you've had it before? the new york daily news is reporting that back in 1998 she had a blood clot behind her left knee. is a recurrence common? >> like many illnesses blood clots are really the summation of risk factors. what i mean by that is you may inherit something. you may be put into a situation and they come together and show itself. there are certain inherited things that give us blood clots at a usually low risk. then if we're put in a situation such as put to bed rest that risk can increase. if you've had a previous clot you are at hi
in this situation. senator vitter? >> thanks, madame chair. i want to make three points briefly. first of all, again, i want to express my real sympathy for all the victims of sandy. this was a horrible, devastating disaster, wiping out homes, businesses, and livelihoods and it has a tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i'm certainly supportive of acting quickly in terms of help and aid that is going to directly, immediately help those victims. we also need to do that in a thoughtful and responsive -- responsible way with the american taxpayer in mind we can do both of those things. so i certainly support that. secondly on the s.p.a. side i think there is good news and there is room for counting improvement. the good news i do think we've come a long way, positively since katrina and rita. and the s.p.a. disaster response has been improved. the response in 2005 was slow an inadequate before steven preston took over and turned the program around and it has improved since then. were able to work on this committee in a bipartisan to write and enact further reforms that the senator mentio
should defeat coburn. mrs. feinstein: well, thank you very much, madam president. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: thank you, mr. president. one of the things that i have learned in chairing the energy and water subcommittee, which is the committee that handles appropriations for the army corps of engineers, is how really difficult it is to get projects started, funded and constructed. and so i am one, particularly in view of storms, earthquakes, floods, damages, that you also need to do the mitigation because once it happens once, there's a heavy likelihood that it could happen again. so i rise in opposition to this amendment. the provision that the senator from oklahoma proposes would essentially take a project that's authorized, that has gone to the corps for study -- i beg your pardon? the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mrs. feinstein: may i ask for two minutes additional time, please. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. would essentially take a corps project that ha
recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, chairman garrett. thank you ranking member, madam waters and mr. gensler and mr. cook, the witnesses. i want to remind my colleagues of the importance of cooperation and collaboration with our international partners. i believe the u.s. should demonstrate our global leadership by raising our financial standards and not entering into a race to the bottom of sorts of banking standards. i also believe that the provisions of dodd-frank that were in place five years ago would not have faced, we wouldn't have faced the economic crises we are just beginning to crawl out of. so i'm very reluctant to carve out more exceptions or exemptions to dodd-frank before rules are fully put in place to fully implement the law or without more speculation that could go wrong. my colleague, peter king, would have us suspend enforcement of dodd-frank's volcker rule until our international partners have instituted their own regulations addressing proprietary trading. as i mentioned in my opening statement, i strongly believe that the u.s. should lead by example and not wai
the rest of the statement for the record. thank you. >> madam secretary. >> good morning, chairman menendez, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my role as to the secretary of grant programs with hud i am responsible for the community development's block grant program, the disaster recovery grant and home program. the disaster recovery program is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters like superstorm sandy. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work had has started and will continue for long term recovery in the region. additional details on these points on secretary donovan's role as head of the sandy recovery task force are provided in witness testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed had massive and very impact on the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island. especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of the nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to homes and apartments and individuals, ex
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18